New Wall Plate from Wolf Dottir

A few weeks ago I added a new piece to our plate wall and it’s so perfect. I’ve been following Margaret, Wolf Dottir, for ages on Instagram and I’ve been wanting one of her pieces to add to our plate wall for just as long.
Recently we sent a few messages back and forth as I loved her The Great Mother plate [which was out of stock at the time], so I asked if she had any other plates she would be willing to print her Great Mother artwork on [yes, Margaret is a talented artist as well plate technician (is that even a term? Well she is)] another plate. A week later I had my hands on this custom piece and it has perfectly bridged our plate wall to a second dining room wall.

I’ll include below an updated legend of the other plates included on our wall, as they’ve moved around a bit since I last blogged about our wall.

SOURCE LIST:
1. Fuck That Shit decorative plate by Lou Brown Vintage
2. Thrifted ‘abundance’ plate from Value Village [extra points if you get the SNL reference]
3. Thrifted gold plate
4. Thrifted side plate from Value Village
5. Plate left in our Lower Town apartment by previous tenants
6. Thrifted plate from Value Village, added a sparkly black gothic ‘C’ using my Cricut
7. Insect Mandala side plate by The Curious Department
8. Bubble wall sculpture by Lana Filippone
9. Thrifted tea set from a charity shop in Dublin for our wedding
10. Plate left in our Lower Town apartment by previous tenants

I love adding more pieces to this corner and can’t wait to see where I find my next plate.

A decorative plate display for our dining room

A few weeks ago I added a plate display to our dining room and I’m so pleased with how it turned out. I added some of my favourite thrifted plates along side some very fancy one-of-a-kind plates I’ve collected over the years.

A lot of the steps I took to hang the plates are pretty obvious, but since I encountered some trial and error [i.e. I dropped a plate], I thought I’d share my whole hanging process as this was the first time I’ve ever hung up decorative plates.

I started by making an arrangement with our plates [above] and swapped them around until I was happy with how they looked. I next left them on our dining room table for 5 days and awkwardly ate each meal around them. This step is optional.

I next worked on how to hang up the plates. Two of the plates came with hooks already fixed to the back, and I think we were in a state of lockdown when I was working on this [I’m loosing track of lockdowns at this point], so it wasn’t an option for me to walk into our local hardware store to pick up some sort of plate hooks, so I DIYed my own. I took some pull tabs, bent them slightly with plyers, and super-glued the bottom to the back of the remaining plates [seem below]. As an added strengthener, I super-glued a long piece of masking tape through each the pull tab. This looks 9,000% flimsy, but the masking tape sealed rock-hard to the back, adding extra “just in case Cora goes on a stomping rampage” insurance to each plate. Trust me, this is incredibly secure.

I then began adding the plates to the wall by starting with placing the two largest plates as a starting point, then adding one plate at a time. TOP TIP: it’s a total pain in the ass, but take every plate down before you hammer in a new nail [so your pattern will be: hang up a plate, hold up another plate, mark the next nail, and take down all previous plates before nailing in the next nail]. I didn’t do this in the beginning and my hammering caused the large plain plate to jiggle off the nail and fall. Luckily, it didn’t break. Taking all the plates off before nailing in the next nail is a total time-suck, but worth it in the end.

SOURCE LIST:
1. Fuck That Shit decorative plate by Lou Brown Vintage
2. Thrifted gold plate
3. Thrifted side plate from Value Village
4. Plate left in our Lower Town apartment by previous tenants
5. Thrifted side plate from a charity shop in Dublin
6. Insect Mandala side plate by The Curious Department
7. Bubble wall sculpture by Lana Filippone
8. Thrifted tea set from a charity shop in Dublin for our wedding
9. Plate left in our Lower Town apartment by previous tenants

Special mention for one of my favourite plates which was a recent pregnancy insomnia purchase, Fuck That Shit plate from Lou Brown Vintage [pictured below is a similar plate since they’re all one-of-a-kind]:

I have many more plates I’d like to add to this corner in our dining room. A good few of which will be from Canadian artists I’ve found through Instagram over the past while, and there will be more thrifted plates as well. I’d love to have so many plates that they overflow onto the next wall.

In short: this plate display virgin is a solid convert.

Also featured: secondhand painted black highchair, pretty gold curtain rods

Slow design – curtain rods

If your first reaction to reading the headline of this post was, “wow, it must be a slow news day if you’re writing about curtain rods”, then you wouldn’t be far off.

There are so many little projects I want to start on our house, but I never know where to start. I am not afraid to admit I don’t have a clear design plan yet for our home, and for some reason I feel guilty. Maybe from seeing bloggers move into a home and within a month, their whole house is redesigned. No thank you, that’s not me, and I’m learning it’s okay to be doing design slowly. One of those slow design decisions recently was looking for a beautiful set of curtain rods for our dining room.

By this point you will probably not be surprised to hear that I first looked for a long time for some curtain rods secondhand online. I searched and searched, but I gave up because the secondhand curtain rods I did find online were …

  • Cheap, low quality or made of plastic
  • Wildly overpriced [some people need their heads checked]
  • Didn’t fit our window dimensions
  • Couldn’t find more than one of the same style
  • Straight up fugly

I tried my best, I did. But I gave up and started looking online for some alternatives. If I was going to buy new curtain rods, I wanted them to be sleek and really lovely. I found the brass finish Umbra Cappa [which sounds like a fraternity from Monsters University] curtain rods from Home Depot at $30. I took a chance and ordered two rods; one for each window in our dining room.

We collected them from our local Home Depot and I immediately hung one set up by our basement door. I hung our IKEA curtains [I don’t think they sell them anymore so I won’t try and link to them] and I think they look so perfect. It’s a really subtle addition having brass curtain rods in our dining room, but a detail I completely love.

I will conclude this post with a quote from Robert:

“You’re going to hang curtains? But we already have blinds on the windows … Isn’t that enough?”

Bless.